The Milwaukee Art Museum will reopen fully to the public on July 15

Fafter a year of not entirely complete reopening, the Milwaukee Art Museum will reopen fully to the public on July 15. Like, all galleries and exhibitions. For real this time. FIND THOSE CATS AND DOGS.

“We are delighted to welcome visitors back to a fully reopened museum,” said Robert Stein, deputy director and head of experience, in a press release. “This is a fantastic opportunity for the community to reconnect with many of their favorite works of art that they haven’t seen in over a year. “

Masks, you ask? Yes, MAM says:

The Museum continues to balance welcoming a growing number of visitors while supporting a safe environment for staff and the community. A significant proportion of visitors are families with children aged 12 and under, not yet eligible for the vaccine. Inside the Museum, face coverings are compulsory for staff and visitors. In the East End, masks can be removed while guests eat and drink. Outside, visitors will be asked to follow social distancing protocols and museum staff will be masked.

Get your tickets HERE. Here is the full press release, preceded by MAM advertisement from 1983.

Milwaukee Art Museum reopens fully to the public on July 15
Visitors will be able to explore art in all of the Museum’s collection galleries

Milwaukee, Wisconsin – July 8, 2021 – Visitors to the Milwaukee Art Museum will soon be able to view art in the collection’s galleries, along with three new exhibits, when the museum fully reopens to the public on July 15, 2021.

Open for the first time since March 2020, the mezzanine level of the museum will once again showcase works from one of the country’s main popular and self-taught art collections. Visitors can also explore paintings and sculptures from one of the world’s most important collections of 20th century Haitian art.

On Level 2, favorite works from the Bradley Collection by artists such as Marc Chagall, Helen Frankenthaler, Georgia O’Keeffe, Gabrielle Munter, Pablo Picasso and Pierre-Auguste Renoir will be accessible, as well as the Museum’s extensive American and European collections. . Visitors will be able to see the Arts and Crafts Gallery, The Wood Gatherer by Jules Bastien-Lepage, and the new Study of a Model (1885) acquisition by German painter Max Pietschmann, as well as numerous works from The Layton Collection and Chipstone Foundation.

“We are delighted to welcome visitors back to a fully reopened museum,” said Robert Stein, Deputy Director and Head of Experience. “This is a fantastic opportunity for the community to reconnect with many of their favorite works of art that they haven’t seen in over a year. We are especially excited for guests to discover Pauline Parker’s incredible quilts. “

Originally slated to open in March 2020 in the Bradley Family Gallery, The Quilts of Pauline Parker features more than 30 items that showcase the artist’s expressive approach to quilt making. The installation illustrates how Parker transformed a traditionally domestic craft into one that highlights current events, historical and biblical figures, and his own travels and experiences. Parker studied painting at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago, but her work on fabric began in Wisconsin, where she relocated upon retirement. The exhibition will be on view until December 5, 2021.

A new three-part exhibition, American Memory: Commemoration, Nostalgia, and Revision, seeks to explore and reveal the selective edition of historical accounts of America’s past through drawings, prints and paintings from the collection of the Museum. Starting July 15, on the Museum’s first floor, Chapter 1: People and Identity features works that explore the nature of portraiture, those who make portraits and the stories they tell about their subjects. Chapter 2: Activism and Terrorism, also opened on July 15, in a gallery on the second floor, studies the normalization of racist and violent images. Chapter 3: Answers and Reviews will open on October 1. Chapter 1 will be visible until October 31; Chapter 2 will run until December 5; Chapter 3 will run until January 16, 2022.

July 15 will also mark the opening of First Impressions: Early Printed Books in Europe in European art galleries at level 2. The development of printing in Germany in the 1450s revolutionized production and distribution. of the written word. No longer reliant on long handwritten manuscripts, communication has undergone a major transformation, much like the introduction of social media has in our time. The 25 objects on display, including individual sheets and bound books, were created during the first century after the adoption of printing and provide an opportunity to explore the art and context of early printed books.

Until August 29, Byrdcliffe: Creativity and Creation will once again be on view in the Godfrey American Art Wing on Level 2. Through drawings, designs, ceramics and furniture, the Layton Art Collection Focus exhibition highlights spotlight the creative output of the utopian Byrdcliffe Arts and Crafts Colony during the growing popularity of the Arts and Crafts movement in the early decades of the 20th century.

Museum members are invited to be among the first to revisit the fully reopened galleries during special early access hours for members, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday July 17 and Sunday July 18, thanks to PNC.

Presented in the Baker / Rowland Galleries, Americans in Spain: Painting and Travel, 1820-1920 is the first major exhibition to focus on the considerable impact of Spanish art and culture on American painters of the 19th and early 1900s. of the XXth century. Until October 3, more than 100 paintings, photographs and prints will be presented chronologically and organized to focus on migration, tourism and travel in 19th century Spain.

The museum store is open in its new location at Windhover Hall, across from the Baker / Rowland Galleries. Buyers will find unique gifts and exclusive products inspired by the Museum’s architecture and collection. The East End has reopened with homemade tapas, sandwiches and salads inspired by the Americans in Spain exhibit.

Outside, the public is invited to tour the East Lawn of the Museum for Lakeside at MAM. Throughout the summer, during Museum opening hours, the community is invited to relax, enjoy snacks and refreshments, and enjoy a wide variety of programming opportunities such as live music and yoga. Families can participate in art activities with Kohl’s Art Studio, and East End commissions can be enjoyed on the museum terrace.

The Museum continues to balance welcoming a growing number of visitors while supporting a safe environment for staff and the community. A significant proportion of visitors are families with children aged 12 and under, not yet eligible for the vaccine. Inside the Museum, face coverings are compulsory for staff and visitors. In the East End, masks can be removed while guests eat and drink. Outside, visitors will be asked to follow social distancing protocols and museum staff will be masked.

The Milwaukee Art Museum sincerely thanks Visionaries 2021: Donna and Donald Baumgartner, Murph Burke, Joel and Caran Quadracci, and Sue and Bud Selig. Visionaries support the Museum through annual sponsorship of three essential pillars within the strategic direction: art relevant to the community, strong community programming, and expansive hospitality.

Americans in Spain: Painting and Travel, 1820-1920 is made possible in part by a large grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human effort. The Henry Luce Foundation is the main national sponsor of Americans in Spain, which is also supported by an allowance from the Federal Council for the Arts and Humanities. Supporting sponsors are the Wyeth Foundation for American Art, the American Arts Society at the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Spanish Tourist Board in Chicago; Contributing sponsors are Christie’s and the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation.

Pauline Parker’s Quilts are made possible through the support of the McCombe and Pfeifer families and the Gottlob Armbrust Family Fund in memory of Helen Louise Pfeifer. Supporting sponsors include the Friends of the Art of the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Garden Club of the Milwaukee Art Museum. First Impressions: Early Printed Books in Europe is made possible with the support of Kenneth R. Treis. Byrdcliffe: Creativity and creation are made possible through the support of Barbara Nitchie Fuldner and Layton Art Collection, Inc. Lakeside at MAM is made possible through the support of BMO Harris Bank.

Ticket reservations for the Milwaukee Art Museum can be made at mam.org/visit.

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