http://veganstvo.net/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 15:11:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 Alta Bistro and Audain Art Museum join forces for an art + dinner experience http://veganstvo.net/alta-bistro-and-audain-art-museum-join-forces-for-an-art-dinner-experience/ Wed, 04 Aug 2021 18:07:23 +0000 http://veganstvo.net/alta-bistro-and-audain-art-museum-join-forces-for-an-art-dinner-experience/

The culinary and artistic experience includes an artistic visit to the Audain Art Museum and an elevated dinner at the Alta Bistro in Whistler.

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Alta + Audain gastronomic art experience

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Or: Audain Art Museum, 4350 Blackcomb Road, Whistler

When: Every Friday evening until September 3

Info: audainartmuseum.com/alta (marketing@audainartmuseum.com); aD altabistro.com/audain (604-932-2582)


Food aspires to be art. Art, on the other hand, does not want to be greedy. But Whistler’s Audain Art Museum has a soft spot for Alta Bistro, inviting the restaurant to its jaw-dropping property for dinner every Friday night.

This summer romance includes an upscale, artist-inspired four-course dinner and a ‘sample’ tour of the museum, as described by director and chief curator Curtis Collins.

This year, the event has become very affordable, with the menu reduced to four courses compared to the previous six. Collins is one of two tour guides showcasing the art of British Columbia and he also visits diners during the meal (groups are staggered for tours and dinner).

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I was touched by the visit because it presents a number of historical and contemporary objects of the First Nations. And in this time of reckoning with the horrors of residential schools, art opens the doors to thousands of years of First Nations culture. The most astonishing of the works is a contemporary wall-sized sculpture – The Dance Screen (The Scream Too) by Haida chef and sculptor James Hart – a plaintive howl against the current plight of the salmon., which has been at the heart of Haida culture.

The Dance Screen (The Scream Too) by Haida conductor and sculptor James Hart.
The Dance Screen (The Scream Too) by Haida conductor and sculptor James Hart. jpg

The museum, on a small scale and large on drama and intimacy, in a way amplifies the voice of art. “As a boutique museum, our strengths lie in the sculptures, the paintings of artists such as Emily Carr and Jack Shadbolt, the photographic art of Jeff Wall, Stan Douglas and Rodney Graham,” says Curtis. “These sample tours are exactly that. They are a taste of getting you back. Everyone who attends receives a free pass for this weekend and hopefully they will come back and enjoy the collection. The longer term goal is for us to become a steady stop.

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Better yet, it will trigger generosity. “Today we received an email (from an event attendee) proposing a major donation of a work of art,” he says.

After the tour, guests exit down the stairs to an open space under a floating part of the building, framing a meadow and a grove of trees. Alta Bistro chef and co-owner Nick Cassettari shows his skill in elevating the local bistro’s cuisine with a touch of whimsy. “It’s an opportunity to have flair and to exert culinary inspiration,” he says.

He cooked at Quay, one of Australia’s best restaurants, and staged in Michelin-starred places in Europe. In Whistler, he cooked at Araxi and Nita Lake Lodge. I have always loved his bistro-style cuisine and love to see his creativity run wild. And if you ask me, the fresh, aromatic mountain air adds another layer of deliciousness.

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Picasso-inspired dish by Alta Bistro.
Picasso-inspired dish by Alta Bistro. jpg

Picasso kicked off the dinner. “Towards the end of his life, he became quite hypochondriac and ate only porridge, fish and vegetables,” says Cassettari. The dish gives us a high-end hypochondria: an arrangement of wild rice croquettes, halibut, grilled octopus with roasted grape escabeche and Pemberton raw vegetables.

The second course evokes Andy Warhol with a panzanella salad served in a can of Campbell’s soup. Lift the box to reveal it: homemade bread, flattened, molded into a tube, then dehydrated and baked. Inside this cracker-shaped cylinder is a tomato salad. A waiter pours a concentrated gazpacho vinaigrette on it. “Who expects there is a salad under the box. It took a lot of work to figure it out, ”says Cassettari. He adds a little tomato stalk to the gazpacho. “It’s full of crazy aromatic oils. I crush some of it and put it in the blender. Good advice.

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Next: Vittore Carpaccio, an early Renaissance Venetian painter, the namesake of thinly sliced ​​raw meat. The chef has prepared a magnificent Wagyu beef carpaccio, served loose on roast and sliced forma nova beets (they are long, not round), smoked goat feta with wild blue spruce and sour cherry vinaigrette. Carpaccio, the dish, was first served at Harry’s Bar in Venice to a countess whose doctor recommended she eat raw meat, and is named after the artist who used lots of reds and brown, the colors of raw meat.

Curtis Collins, director and chief curator of the Audain Art Museum, and Eric Griffith, owner of the Alta Bistro.
Curtis Collins, director and chief curator of the Audain Art Museum, and Eric Griffith, owner of the Alta Bistro. jpg

And for dessert, aJackson Pollock scribbles sauces on a vegetable mousse of cashews and vanilla with a bold circle of orange from half a grilled peach.

Dinners, which run through September 3, cost $ 99, and food and wine pairings can be ordered by the glass or paired with each course for $ 49. The menu will change with another list of artist-inspired dishes on August 13.

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“Reservations are going very well,” says Eric Griffith, co-owner of Alta Bistro. “If you book at the last minute, you won’t get in.” In other words, you sleep, you lose.

ACCOMPANIMENTS

Some hearts grew during the pandemic. Organic Ocean – a supplier of sustainable, premium seafood to discerning, conservation-conscious high-end chefs locally and internationally – has stepped up its charity program just as restaurants and chefs have had to cut back significantly their orders.

The company launched an online retail store to sell products and keep employees and fishermen employed. It turned out to be a success. “Once it was clear that the Internet was going to be an integral part of our business, we wanted to integrate a social component. It’s part of our DNA, ”says Guy Dean, president of the company. “People think that sustainability is associated with the environment. We think it’s more. It’s environmental, economic and social.

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The company therefore created Neighbors Helping Neighbors, donating two seafood meals for each online order received. (A typical order is around $ 200.) He donated to the Vancouver Aquarium and the Kelty Patrick Dennehy Foundation which helps people with social and mental issues. Additionally, she has donated seafood to A Loving Spoonful, Union Gospel Mission, Goodly Foods Society, Growing Chefs, Squamish and Langley Food Banks, and The Stop Community Food Center in Toronto. Since the end of December, they have donated over $ 15,000 worth of seafood, or 5,647 meals, through A Loving Spoonful and The Stop Community Food Center alone.

Now they’ve made the charitable giving permanent, relaunching the program as Until We’re All Fed, Donating Seafood “For As Long As It Takes To End Hunger In The Community “. This, Dean says, looks like it will be “in perpetuity.”

mia.stainsby@shaw.ca

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Little Art Theater appoints new director http://veganstvo.net/little-art-theater-appoints-new-director/ Tue, 27 Jul 2021 17:37:16 +0000 http://veganstvo.net/little-art-theater-appoints-new-director/

Photo courtesy of the Little Art Theater The Little Art Theater will host a screening of “Ghostbusters” at the end of July and has a full reopening in the fall.

YELLOW SPRINGS – The Little Art Theater in Yellow Springs has named Kristina Heaton as its new CEO, with its first community event since the onset of the pandemic at the end of this month.

Moviegoers are invited to gather on the lawn of the John Bryan Center at sunset on July 31 for popcorn and a screening of the movie “Ghostbusters”. The outdoor show is the first since Little Art temporarily closed its doors in the summer of 2020, the longest hiatus in its history.

“It’s a way of saying ‘thank you for your patience’,” Heaton said. “Everyone is really excited.

Heaton, a longtime resident of Beavercreek, took her family films at Little Art for years before becoming a director. She graduated from Wright State University and has a background in local arts education. She also operated a small business that closed due to COVID-19, and said that by coming to Little Art, it was time to “get wet again” in the business world.

“It’s such a popular institution in the city. It’s a lovely theater, ”Heaton said. “I just want to continue with this rich history, continue this tradition of providing world class entertainment in a small town environment.”

Heaton said she was in the process of preparing the theater for the reopening. Staff hope the films will be safely back in theaters by early fall.

“Everything looks fine as far as this is happening,” she said. “Throughout this process [of COVID-19] you never know what to expect from week to week. We want to make sure we do it safely. “

Heaton encouraged moviegoers to bring a blanket or lawn chair on July 31 for a “fun and low-key community event.”

The theater was established in 1929 and screened its first film there in February 1930. In 2009 it became a non-profit organization under the leadership of Jenny Cowperthwaite. Cowperthwaite stepped down in late 2020, according to a statement from theater administrators.

Photo courtesy of the Little Art Theater The Little Art Theater will host a screening of “Ghostbusters” at the end of July and has a full reopening in the fall.

Contact London Bishop at 937-502-4532 or follow @LBishopFDH on Twitter.




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Davison Art Center loans rare 16th-century print to the Met http://veganstvo.net/davison-art-center-loans-rare-16th-century-print-to-the-met-2/ Mon, 26 Jul 2021 14:57:40 +0000 http://veganstvo.net/davison-art-center-loans-rare-16th-century-print-to-the-met-2/

The Davison Art Center is loaning the print “Alessandro de ‘Medici and Grand Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici of Toscane” to the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a recent exhibition on the Medici. The print, engraved by Martino Rota, was gifted to Wesleyan by Davison Art Center namesake art collector George W. Davison (BA 1892) in 1943. (Open access image courtesy of Davison Art Center. Photo by Mr. Johnston)

It’s common today to talk about building your own brand – everyone from world leaders to early teens worries about their image, shapes their online personality, creates a character that straddles reality and imagination.

For the Medici family, the rulers of Florence and Tuscany in the 16th century, and the patrons of some of the Renaissance’s most famous works of art, the tools to achieve this were very different from those of today. However, the goal was the same.

Wesleyan’s Davison Arts Center (DAC) participates in an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art titled “The Medici: Portraits and Politics, 1512-1570 ”, currently on display until October 11. The exhibition brings together more than 90 works, including portraits, engravings, busts, medals and armor, to describe the rise to power of the Medici family after a period of exile, and to show how they used the culture to shape public perception.

The DAC lends a rare 16th century print commemorating the reign of the Medici over Tuscany. The Met requested the work in early 2020.

“I find this thing endlessly fascinating. It’s amazing how these fragile pieces of paper, and all works of art, survive through the centuries. To be able to work with these [works] and sharing them with students and the public is something I’m really grateful for, ”said Miya Tokumitsu, curator of the Davison Art Center.

CAD’s contribution to the exhibit is a 7.2 x 7 inch print– essentially a piece of political propaganda. The prints in this particular print, made in honor of Cosimo I de Medici’s rise to power, could have been passed on from person to person, pasted into books or given as gifts, Tokumitsu said. Distributing prints like this was a way for people of the day to learn about major works of art and the persuasive efforts of their rulers. “This print is small enough that it could have been displayed in various ways,” she said.

The iconography of the print is extremely specific and tells a particular story of political power. “It takes sides. It’s very pro-Medici, shameless and unambiguous, ”Tokumitsu said.

The goddess Flora, personification of the city of Florence, dominates the print, her wings bearing the names of the Tuscan cities united under the reign of the Medici.

Flora crowns two portraits of sovereigns. Alessandro de ‘Medici, the first Duke of Florence, is represented on the left against a background of Florence. His successor Cosimo I de Medici is depicted on the right, described in the print as the “Grand Duke of Tuscany”, with an elaborate Grand Ducal diadem above him. Cosimo sits high above the landscape of Siena, the last of the rebel towns to fall into the hands of the Medici.

Read correctly, the engraving clearly indicates to the viewer who is the legitimate ruler of Florence: “Thus, it is Cosimo who really deserves the title of Grand Duke of Tuscany, for it was he who had finally united Tuscany under the domination. of the Medici. according to the exhibition catalog.

“He uses all kinds of strategies: allegory, personification, portrait, landscape, heraldry. (Engraver Martino) Rota is playing all the cards, ”Tokumitsu said.

So what is the modern equivalent of this print? One possibility is Barack Obama’s famous Shepard Fairey print with the word “Hope”.

“It’s a pretty good comparison,” Tokumitsu said. “Obviously we have a different political system – the Medici were hereditary dukes and we are in a modern democracy. But it’s pretty funny what doesn’t change. The portrait format in the Obama image is a bust portrait, just like what we are looking at with Alessandro and Cosimo. This front bust portrait is a durable format. It’s also an impression, which I think is very important. He uses text in a very new way. So there are a lot of parallels. There is something really enduring about being a leader.

The Davison Art Center collection is available online at Search the Davison Art Center collection. Digital images of over 6,000 non-copyrighted works of art are available for direct, free download as high-quality JPEG or TIFF files.


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Davison Art Center loans rare 16th-century print to the Met http://veganstvo.net/davison-art-center-loans-rare-16th-century-print-to-the-met/ Mon, 26 Jul 2021 14:57:40 +0000 http://veganstvo.net/davison-art-center-loans-rare-16th-century-print-to-the-met/

The Davison Art Center is loaning the print “Alessandro de ‘Medici and Grand Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici of Toscane” to the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a recent exhibition on the Medici. The print, engraved by Martino Rota, was donated to Wesleyan by Davison Art Center namesake art collector George W. Davison (BA 1892) in 1943. (Open access image courtesy of Davison Art Center. Photo by Mr. Johnston)

It’s common today to talk about building your own brand – everyone from world leaders to early teens worries about their image, shapes their online personality, creates a character that straddles reality and imagination.

For the Medici family, the rulers of Florence and Tuscany in the 16th century, and the patrons of some of the Renaissance’s most famous works of art, the tools to achieve this were very different from those of today. However, the goal was the same.

Wesleyan’s Davison Arts Center (DAC) participates in an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art titled “The Medici: Portraits and Politics, 1512-1570 ”, currently on display until October 11. The exhibition brings together more than 90 works, including portraits, engravings, busts, medals and armor, to describe the rise to power of the Medici family after a period of exile, and to show how they used the culture to shape public perception.

The DAC lends a rare 16th century print commemorating the reign of the Medici over Tuscany. The Met requested the work in early 2020.

“I find this thing endlessly fascinating. It’s amazing how these fragile pieces of paper, and all works of art, survive through the centuries. To be able to work with these [works] and sharing them with students and the public is something I’m really grateful for, ”said Miya Tokumitsu, curator of the Davison Art Center.

CAD’s contribution to the exhibit is a 7.2 x 7 inch print– essentially a piece of political propaganda. The prints in this particular print, made in honor of Cosimo I de Medici’s rise to power, could have been passed from person to person, pasted into books or given as gifts, Tokumitsu said. Distributing prints like this was a way for people of the day to learn about major works of art and the persuasive efforts of their rulers. “This print is small enough that it could have been displayed in various ways,” she said.

The iconography of the print is extremely specific and tells a particular story of political power. “It takes sides. It’s very pro-Medici, shameless and unambiguous, ”Tokumitsu said.

The goddess Flora, personification of the city of Florence, dominates the print, her wings bearing the names of the Tuscan cities united under the reign of the Medici.

Flora crowns two portraits of sovereigns. Alessandro de ‘Medici, the first Duke of Florence, is represented on the left against a background of Florence. His successor Cosimo I de Medici is depicted on the right, described in the print as the “Grand Duke of Tuscany”, with an elaborate Grand Ducal diadem above him. Cosimo sits high above the landscape of Siena, the last of the rebel towns to fall into the hands of the Medici.

Read correctly, the engraving clearly indicates to the viewer who is the legitimate ruler of Florence: “Thus, it is Cosimo who really deserves the title of Grand Duke of Tuscany, for it was he who had finally united Tuscany under the domination. of the Medici. according to the exhibition catalog.

“He uses all kinds of strategies: allegory, personification, portrait, landscape, heraldry. (Engraver Martino) Rota is playing all the cards, ”Tokumitsu said.

So what is the modern equivalent of this print? One possibility is Barack Obama’s famous Shepard Fairey print with the word “Hope”.

“It’s a pretty good comparison,” Tokumitsu said. “Obviously we have a different political system – the Medici were hereditary dukes and we are in a modern democracy. But it’s pretty funny what doesn’t change. The portrait format in the Obama image is a bust portrait, just like what we are looking at with Alessandro and Cosimo. This front bust portrait is a durable format. It’s also an impression, which I think is very important. He uses text in a very new way. So there are a lot of parallels. There is something really enduring about being a leader.

The Davison Art Center collection is available online at Search the Davison Art Center collection. Digital images of over 6,000 non-copyrighted works of art are available for direct, free download as high-quality JPEG or TIFF files.


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The Milwaukee Art Museum will reopen fully to the public on July 15 http://veganstvo.net/the-milwaukee-art-museum-will-reopen-fully-to-the-public-on-july-15/ Thu, 08 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://veganstvo.net/the-milwaukee-art-museum-will-reopen-fully-to-the-public-on-july-15/

Fafter a year of not entirely complete reopening, the Milwaukee Art Museum will reopen fully to the public on July 15. Like, all galleries and exhibitions. For real this time. FIND THOSE CATS AND DOGS.

“We are delighted to welcome visitors back to a fully reopened museum,” said Robert Stein, deputy director and head of experience, in a press release. “This is a fantastic opportunity for the community to reconnect with many of their favorite works of art that they haven’t seen in over a year. “

Masks, you ask? Yes, MAM says:

The Museum continues to balance welcoming a growing number of visitors while supporting a safe environment for staff and the community. A significant proportion of visitors are families with children aged 12 and under, not yet eligible for the vaccine. Inside the Museum, face coverings are compulsory for staff and visitors. In the East End, masks can be removed while guests eat and drink. Outside, visitors will be asked to follow social distancing protocols and museum staff will be masked.

Get your tickets HERE. Here is the full press release, preceded by MAM advertisement from 1983.

Milwaukee Art Museum reopens fully to the public on July 15
Visitors will be able to explore art in all of the Museum’s collection galleries

Milwaukee, Wisconsin – July 8, 2021 – Visitors to the Milwaukee Art Museum will soon be able to view art in the collection’s galleries, along with three new exhibits, when the museum fully reopens to the public on July 15, 2021.

Open for the first time since March 2020, the mezzanine level of the museum will once again showcase works from one of the country’s main popular and self-taught art collections. Visitors can also explore paintings and sculptures from one of the world’s most important collections of 20th century Haitian art.

On Level 2, favorite works from the Bradley Collection by artists such as Marc Chagall, Helen Frankenthaler, Georgia O’Keeffe, Gabrielle Munter, Pablo Picasso and Pierre-Auguste Renoir will be accessible, as well as the Museum’s extensive American and European collections. . Visitors will be able to see the Arts and Crafts Gallery, The Wood Gatherer by Jules Bastien-Lepage, and the new Study of a Model (1885) acquisition by German painter Max Pietschmann, as well as numerous works from The Layton Collection and Chipstone Foundation.

“We are delighted to welcome visitors back to a fully reopened museum,” said Robert Stein, Deputy Director and Head of Experience. “This is a fantastic opportunity for the community to reconnect with many of their favorite works of art that they haven’t seen in over a year. We are especially excited for guests to discover Pauline Parker’s incredible quilts. “

Originally slated to open in March 2020 in the Bradley Family Gallery, The Quilts of Pauline Parker features more than 30 items that showcase the artist’s expressive approach to quilt making. The installation illustrates how Parker transformed a traditionally domestic craft into one that highlights current events, historical and biblical figures, and his own travels and experiences. Parker studied painting at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago, but her work on fabric began in Wisconsin, where she relocated upon retirement. The exhibition will be on view until December 5, 2021.

A new three-part exhibition, American Memory: Commemoration, Nostalgia, and Revision, seeks to explore and reveal the selective edition of historical accounts of America’s past through drawings, prints and paintings from the collection of the Museum. Starting July 15, on the Museum’s first floor, Chapter 1: People and Identity features works that explore the nature of portraiture, those who make portraits and the stories they tell about their subjects. Chapter 2: Activism and Terrorism, also opened on July 15, in a gallery on the second floor, studies the normalization of racist and violent images. Chapter 3: Answers and Reviews will open on October 1. Chapter 1 will be visible until October 31; Chapter 2 will run until December 5; Chapter 3 will run until January 16, 2022.

July 15 will also mark the opening of First Impressions: Early Printed Books in Europe in European art galleries at level 2. The development of printing in Germany in the 1450s revolutionized production and distribution. of the written word. No longer reliant on long handwritten manuscripts, communication has undergone a major transformation, much like the introduction of social media has in our time. The 25 objects on display, including individual sheets and bound books, were created during the first century after the adoption of printing and provide an opportunity to explore the art and context of early printed books.

Until August 29, Byrdcliffe: Creativity and Creation will once again be on view in the Godfrey American Art Wing on Level 2. Through drawings, designs, ceramics and furniture, the Layton Art Collection Focus exhibition highlights spotlight the creative output of the utopian Byrdcliffe Arts and Crafts Colony during the growing popularity of the Arts and Crafts movement in the early decades of the 20th century.

Museum members are invited to be among the first to revisit the fully reopened galleries during special early access hours for members, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday July 17 and Sunday July 18, thanks to PNC.

Presented in the Baker / Rowland Galleries, Americans in Spain: Painting and Travel, 1820-1920 is the first major exhibition to focus on the considerable impact of Spanish art and culture on American painters of the 19th and early 1900s. of the XXth century. Until October 3, more than 100 paintings, photographs and prints will be presented chronologically and organized to focus on migration, tourism and travel in 19th century Spain.

The museum store is open in its new location at Windhover Hall, across from the Baker / Rowland Galleries. Buyers will find unique gifts and exclusive products inspired by the Museum’s architecture and collection. The East End has reopened with homemade tapas, sandwiches and salads inspired by the Americans in Spain exhibit.

Outside, the public is invited to tour the East Lawn of the Museum for Lakeside at MAM. Throughout the summer, during Museum opening hours, the community is invited to relax, enjoy snacks and refreshments, and enjoy a wide variety of programming opportunities such as live music and yoga. Families can participate in art activities with Kohl’s Art Studio, and East End commissions can be enjoyed on the museum terrace.

The Museum continues to balance welcoming a growing number of visitors while supporting a safe environment for staff and the community. A significant proportion of visitors are families with children aged 12 and under, not yet eligible for the vaccine. Inside the Museum, face coverings are compulsory for staff and visitors. In the East End, masks can be removed while guests eat and drink. Outside, visitors will be asked to follow social distancing protocols and museum staff will be masked.

The Milwaukee Art Museum sincerely thanks Visionaries 2021: Donna and Donald Baumgartner, Murph Burke, Joel and Caran Quadracci, and Sue and Bud Selig. Visionaries support the Museum through annual sponsorship of three essential pillars within the strategic direction: art relevant to the community, strong community programming, and expansive hospitality.

Americans in Spain: Painting and Travel, 1820-1920 is made possible in part by a large grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human effort. The Henry Luce Foundation is the main national sponsor of Americans in Spain, which is also supported by an allowance from the Federal Council for the Arts and Humanities. Supporting sponsors are the Wyeth Foundation for American Art, the American Arts Society at the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Spanish Tourist Board in Chicago; Contributing sponsors are Christie’s and the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation.

Pauline Parker’s Quilts are made possible through the support of the McCombe and Pfeifer families and the Gottlob Armbrust Family Fund in memory of Helen Louise Pfeifer. Supporting sponsors include the Friends of the Art of the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Garden Club of the Milwaukee Art Museum. First Impressions: Early Printed Books in Europe is made possible with the support of Kenneth R. Treis. Byrdcliffe: Creativity and creation are made possible through the support of Barbara Nitchie Fuldner and Layton Art Collection, Inc. Lakeside at MAM is made possible through the support of BMO Harris Bank.

Ticket reservations for the Milwaukee Art Museum can be made at mam.org/visit.

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Mansfield Art Center presents 2 new exhibitions | Life & Culture News http://veganstvo.net/mansfield-art-center-presents-2-new-exhibitions-life-culture-news/ Sun, 27 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://veganstvo.net/mansfield-art-center-presents-2-new-exhibitions-life-culture-news/

MANSFIELD – Visual authenticity or visual truth in a work of art has changed in its manifestations over time.

During the Renaissance, authenticity meant that art was one with nature and the representative appearance of figure, objects and landscape. Even within the settings, the performers’ interpretations varied widely. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, artists began to have the freedom to explore other avenues of authenticity in their work.






Faint of heart Helen is part of the The Mansfield Art Center’s newest gallery exhibition, which opens June 27.


Visual truth has often been explored on the very surface of works of art and has become a meeting place where the artist finds his own identity truth. The “Authentic Surfaces” exhibition at the Elizabeth T. Black Gallery presents the “truth” of surfaces.

The nine artists representing the works in this exhibition do not claim that their works are anything other than what they are. There is a real authenticity in the relationship between the artistic medium and the surface on which it resides.

Exhibiting artists are John Donnelly and Joshua Eiskamp, ​​painting; Joel O’Dorisio, glass; Todd Leech, ceramics; David Sapp, drawings; Stephen Tomasko, photography; Stephen Yusko and Barry Gunderson, sculpture; and Jennifer Whitten, bead sculpture.

The Foundation Gallery’s “Shush” exhibition by porcelain artist Kimberly Chapman takes audiences on an exploration of the historical abusive treatment of women through porcelain sculptures.






Genuine Surface 2

The most recent gallery exhibition at the Mansfield Art Center opens on June 27.


Chapman wants the public to imagine silencing women with iron-faced bridles, separating mothers and daughters who have taken refuge under the evil cloak of assault and rape, grabbing household tools to protect you and your children, from the rage of an alcoholic husband.

These are just a few of the dangers of womanhood. Kimberly Chapman’s 100 porcelain sculpture exhibition showcases a violent side of human nature. Through the female prism, her highly researched stories appeal to emotionally charged socio-political issues.

She uses porcelain, the same sought-after material used by kings and queens for their elegant tableware, to manifest a woman’s worst nightmare. Chapman, a recent graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Art, says “she creates art to shed light on the injustices that women and children have suffered and continue to suffer.”

These exhibitions will run from June 27 to July 25 at the Mansfield Art Center, 700 Marion Avenue, Mansfield, Ohio. The REACH Gallery exhibition “Unmasked” by ED Jasbeck will run until July 10.

The opening hours are Tuesday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, visit the website at mansfieldartcenter.org.

If you have ever experienced the joy of creativity and culture, then you know the value of the arts. Your support for our reports reinforces this. Become a Source member today.




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Mansfield Art Center has two exhibitions until July 25 http://veganstvo.net/mansfield-art-center-has-two-exhibitions-until-july-25/ Sat, 26 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://veganstvo.net/mansfield-art-center-has-two-exhibitions-until-july-25/

MANSFIELD – The Mansfield Art Center presents two new exhibitions, “Authentic Surface” and “Shush”.

Visual authenticity or visual truth in a work of art has changed in its manifestations over time. In the Renaissance, authenticity meant that art was one with nature and the figurative appearance of figure, objects and landscape.

Even within the settings, the performers’ interpretations varied widely. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, artists began to have the freedom to explore other avenues of authenticity in their work.